She Documented the Ebola Crisis in West Africa. But Filming Inside a Hospital Battling Coronavirus in Her Native Italy Was a Tougher Challenge

Mary

Patients lie motionless in a hospital ICU ward, as doctors hurry around their beds. The patients’ faces are concealed by ventilators; the doctors’ by masks. The death rate is rising so quickly that doctors can no longer keep count. “The beds don’t even have time to cool before they are taken up by other patients,” says ICU nurse Cristina Pilati. Yet over the sound of stretchers rolling and monitors beeping, Pilati starts singing the lyrics of ‘Angel’ as she cares for a teenage boy in the ICU. ‘Spend all your time waiting, for that second chance,’ she sings. ‘For a break that would make it okay.’

This scene is one of many intimate moments in Inside Italy’s COVID War, a PBS’ FRONTLINE documentary premiering Tuesday that takes us inside a hard-hit hospital in Cremona, a city in northern Italy. Directed by Emmy and BAFTA award-winning filmmaker Sasha Joelle Achilli,

How your hair salon or barbershop could be different after coronavirus

Mary

No reception area. No walk-ins. Empty booths.

Those are some of the changes customers can expect to see as hair salons and barber shops begin to reopen across the USA.

Jalainna Ellis, owner of All That Jazz salon and spa in Cheyenne, Wyoming, said taking the temperature of arriving customers became part of the new protocol when she reopened her business May 1.

The magazines and lookbooks are gone, too. Customers head directly to their respective hairstylist rather than waiting in a reception area that no longer exists. Face masks are required, for customers and members of the 17-person staff, Ellis said.

“It’s nerve-wracking,” Ellis told USA TODAY. “We are not trained to wear masks and work. Your vision is skewed, so it takes more concentration.

Bobbing and weaving: Bootleg barbershops and hair salons thrive as coronavirus stay-at-home orders persist in some states

What about my kids? Coronavirus child care

Beaches, parks busy as Europe heat wave and U.S. spring test new coronavirus rules

Mary

By Lisa Shumaker

(Reuters) – Summer weather is enticing much of the world to emerge from coronavirus lockdowns as centers of the outbreak from New York to Italy and Spain gradually lift restrictions that have kept millions indoors for months.

People are streaming back to beaches, parks and streets just as a heat wave hits southern Europe and spring-like temperatures allow Americans to shed winter coats. As they venture out again, most are keeping their distance and some are wearing masks. However, protests are also heating up from Germany to England to the United States, arguing the government restrictions demolish personal liberties and are wrecking economies.

Greeks flocked to the seaside on Saturday when more than 500 beaches reopened, coinciding with temperatures of 34 Celsius (93 Fahrenheit).

Umbrella poles had to be 4 meters (13 ft) apart, with canopies no closer than 1 meter as the country sought to walk

A State-by-State Guide to When Beauty Supply Stores Will Reopen After the Coronavirus

Mary
Professional makeup brushes set and tools.
Professional makeup brushes set and tools.

Just a few months after the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) brought everyday life to a halt, dozens of states are introducing plans to reopen their economies. That includes reopening certain businesses like nail salons, hair salons, and beauty retailers that were forced to temporarily close their doors back in March in order to slow the spread of the virus.

The state of certain nonessential retailers is largely dependent on where they are located, and while many are still grappling with having limited access to hairstylists and other beauty professionals, the question still remains on where beauty supply stores fall into the equation. Ahead, we’ve compiled a state-by-state breakdown of when you can expect these retail stores to open their doors again as stay-at-home orders slowly begin to lift around the country.

Alabama

After the state’s stay-at-home order expired on April 30, Alabama adopted

Are lockdowns being relaxed in my state? Here’s how America is reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Mary

As state governments continue to unveil a patchwork of plans to gradually reopen the American economy, the question that looms in the coming weeks is whether increased resident mobility leads to a surge in new coronavirus cases.

And that question will likely be answered soon. The majority of states are moving forward with phased-in approaches that often vary by county and city.

The Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation is projecting the U.S. to be entering the downward slope of the curve of deaths per day. Still, as of Thursday, the IHME is forecasting the U.S. to suffer 147,040 coronavirus deaths by Aug. 4. The IHME increased that figure, however, by 10,000 just from Monday’s projection.

“I would love to be able to open everything up tomorrow,” Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said Wednesday. “But that would be an incredibly irresponsible thing to do.”

Soaring unemployment and economic stagnancy has spawned 

London has just 24 new coronavirus cases a day

Mary

Coronavirus Article Bar with counter

Fewer than 24 people are catching coronavirus each day in London, new modelling suggests, with forecasts predicting the virus could be wiped out in the capital within a fortnight.

Analysis by Public Health England and Cambridge University calculates that the “R” reproduction rate has fallen to 0.4 in London, with the number of new cases halving every 3.5 days.

If cases continue to decrease at the current rate, the virus will be virtually eliminated in the capital by the end of the month, raising questions about whether the strict lockdown measures would need to continue.

On March 23, at the peak of contagion when lockdown was announced, 213,000 people a day caught the virus in London, according to the research.

That fell dramatically as soon as restrictions were brought in, tumbling below 10,000 by April 7. The number of deaths is halving roughly